NYU Student Health Insurance Accepted Here

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NYU student health, physical therapy, NYU Student insurance accepted here

Good news for NYU students. As of the 2017-2018 school year, Thrive Integrated Physical Therapy is now contracted with your student health insurance plan.

What does this mean to you? Well, in addition to the services provided by your student health center, you can now come to outpatient physical therapy at our facility using your student health insurance.

Getting skilled physical therapy at our boutique downtown location has never been more affordable or convenient for NYU students.

As individual student plans do vary, please give us a call so we can check on your benefits and go over the cost with you.

Give us a call, your physical health is important to us.

     

Snowboarding: Pregame Warm-Up

Posted on Posted in All Posts, Stay in the Game

Winter is here and we have finally had our first real snow! With more snow on the horizon in the next few months, more and more people will be hitting the slopes and snowboarding. While it’s great to head out there and have fun, it’s equally as important to do some activities that prepare you for the challenges associated with snowboarding to limit your risk of injury. Whether you’ve been snowboarding forever or this is your first time, a good routine will help keep you on the slopes enjoying winter longer.

In this post, New York City based Physical Therapist Philippe Corbanese, PT, DPT, will go over a warm-up routine that will target the most commonly used muscles in the sport. When snowboarding, the most commonly engaged muscles are your core, quads, calves and shins. You need to be able to get up from low surfaces, rock back and forth, rotate from your core, and get up from a forward and a backward position. The following is a list of the exercises Philippe would recommend as a warm-up routine to be performed prior to heading out. These exercises do not need to be performed in the order listed. And, as always, before participating in any activity be sure to check with your doctor.

Exercise 1: Side to side trunk rotation. Begin this exercise by standing with your feet wider than shoulder width apart and without moving your legs rotate from your waist back and forth from left to right throughout your full range. Try your best to control the motion and not just use momentum. Perform 15-20 repetitions, going through the full range for 2-3 sets.

 

Exercise 2: Toe touches with opposite hand. Start with feet shoulder width apart and while keeping your knee as straight as possible bring your leg up and touch your toes with the opposite hand. If you can’t quite touch your toes it’s okay just try your best to maintain good form. Perform 10-15 repetitions with each leg for 2-3 sets.

 

Exercise 3: Body weight squats. Start with your feet approximately shoulder width apart and feet in a neutral or close to neutral position and squat as low as you comfortably can. Perform 20-30 repetitions for 2 rounds.

 

Exercise 4: Static lunges with trunk rotations. To perform this start with feet shoulder width apart and bring one foot back so that you are in a long stride stance. Keep your weight primarily through your heel on the front foot and toes on the back foot. Focus on bending your back knee and bringing it close to the ground. When you reach the bottom of the range rotate towards the front leg, back to neutral and then back up. Perform 10-15 repetitions for each side.

 

Exercise 5: Calf stretch against wall with straight knee and bent knee. To perform this exercise place one foot forward and one foot back behind you while keeping your knee straight and hands against a wall. Press back and direct the force through your heel. Hold for at least 30-60 seconds and repeat on both sides for 2-3 repetitions. Get back into the same position but instead bend the back knee while keeping your heel down and shift the weight towards the front of the back foot. Hold for at least 30-60 seconds and repeat on both sides for 2-3 repetitions.

With this warm-up you should be better setup to enjoy the slopes and limit the risk of injury.

 


Philippe Corbanese Physical Therapist SoHo NYPhilippe Corbanese, PT, DPT, is a staff therapist here at Thrive PT in NoHo New York. He has worked in a variety of settings and has treated patients with neurological, orthopedic and sports injuries. These experiences led him to his specialty in sports and orthopedic injuries. For the past five years, he has worked extensively with professional athletes on the US Women’s Rugby team, and the Harlem Wizards as well as collegiate and recreational athletes. (read more)

 

     

Lower Back Pain and the Case for Early PT Intervention

Posted on Posted in All Posts, Take Control of Your Health

Hello friends.  It’s that time again…a new year!  With it comes the promise of new commitments, resolutions made for health and fitness, and renewed zeal and engagement in activity .  We at Thrive want to be part of your move towards greater activity, and are here as your musculoskeletal experts to answer questions, prepare you for sport, and help you heal aches and pains.   That said, I must warn you of a lurking impediment to your wellness.  You’ve guessed it, the NEW DEDUCTIBLE.  Spending time and money on your care is less appealing when it’s an out of pocket cost, and we are intimately familiar with financial stressors and the challenge to access care when it’s at your own expense.

it's time to talk about lower back painSo, without further ado, I am going to make the case for coming to physical therapy (PT) early, and argue why it might save you money, lost time, and pain (both literal and figurative) on the back end.  For the purposes of discussion, we’ll focus on low back pain management.

Anecdotally and empirically, back pain is one of the leading reasons persons come in to PT.  In addition to being difficult physically, emotionally, and financially on the individual, it’s can be costly to health care organizations and employers as it is a common cause of missed work and long-term disability.  In fact, it is the number one cause of disability of persons under the age of 45.1  In recognition of the fact that pain left to fester leads to poor health outcomes, it is imperative that patients go directly to physical therapy when they begin to experience pain.  It’s been found that persons at high risk for low back pain who received early therapeutic intervention have less chronic pain, utilization of healthcare monies, missed work, and medication usage than those that don’t receive care.2 Further studies find that persons with acute low back pain who engage in education, manual therapies, and exercise have improved mood, health, and quality of life than patients who wait for treatment.3

Despite the considerable evidence that therapeutic intervention is integral in pain reduction, resumption of activity, and return to work, you’d be surprised how often people take the “wait and see” approach.    This is especially true in the bleak mid-winter that is January and February.  That stops now, because as you now know, informed reader, the earlier you receive treatment, the faster you improve!   The faster you improve, the less time and money you spend on medication, missed work, and medical appointments!  So you see, I have made the case for PT as a savings vehicle, both of future time and money.  It is settled, deductibles be damned.  We at Thrive look forward to hearing from you and being part of your rehabilitation as you strive for wellness in 2018.

 

Reference(s):
1. Mayer TG, Gatchel RJ. Functional restoration for spinal disorders: The sports medicine approach. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1988.
2. Gatchel J, Polatin P, Now C, Gardea M, Pulliam C, Thompson J. (2003) Treatment and cost-effectiveness of early intervention for actue low-back pain patientsL a one-year prospective study. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, Volume 13 (Issue 1), pp. 1-9.
3. Wand B., Bird C., McAuley J., Doré C., MacDowell M., De Souza L. (2004) Early intervention for the management of acute low back pain: a single-blind randomized controlled trial of biopsychosocial education, manual therapy, and exercise. Spine, Volume 29 (Issue 21), pp. 2350-2350.

Elizabeth D'Annunzio Shah Physical Therapist New York CityElizabeth D’Annunzio Shah, PT, DPT, OCS, MCT works with patients of all ages and abilities including recreational athletes, professional dancers and performing artists. She has a special interest in vestibular and balance disorders, movement theory and creative solutions for both neurologically and musculoskeletally impaired persons. Elizabeth is passionate about exercise as a means to maintain health, manage stress and enjoy life! She practices yoga in the Iyengar tradition, is an avid surfer, and participates in distance running events whenever possible. (read more)

     

What to Expect At Vestibular and Balance Physical Therapy

Posted on Posted in All Posts, Let's Get Technical

As a physical therapist that treats persons with dizziness and balance deficits, I’ve come to realize that people do not know what to expect when they attend physical therapy (PT) for these issues. Due to the lack of exposure to this treatment and unfamiliarity with how it works, people come to their first session with trepidation and fear. So, let’s see what I can do to clear up some of your queries and give a more clear vision of what will occur in PT.

WHY DO PEOPLE GET DIZZY?

There are so many reasons! As I’ve previously mentioned in an earlier blog post, some of the reasons are:

• Inner ear dysfunction having to do with loose calcium deposits. This condition is called Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)
• Nerve changes in the inner ear, often but not always associated with aging
• Fluid imbalance in the inner ear, called Meniere’s Disease
• Strokes in the part of the brain called the cerebellum
• On rare occasion, tumors
• Concussions

Each of these issues requires a different management strategy. Some are movements meant to shoo the calcium deposits out of the canals, and others are aimed at getting your brain used to, and less responsive towards, dizzying movements. That’s why it’s important to work with both your doctor and PT in an effort to maximize your success and initiate the process of understanding your unique scenario.

Vertibular Physical Therapy in New York CityI GUESS I’LL COME TO PT TO WORK ON MY DIZZINESS. HOW DO YOU KNOW WHAT’S CAUSING IT?

The purpose of the initial evaluation is to better understand the nature of your dizziness. Physical therapists can help illuminate what the cause is and how the symptoms might be made better. The therapist will do an ocular examination, motion sensitivity testing, postural awareness testing, and dynamic balance testing in an effort to tease out the cause and identify the most dysfunctional systems. Included as well is positional testing of the inner ear to identify if there are loose crystalline bodies in the canals. Suffice it to say, people are varied and so too is their dizziness. So the first visit, and maybe the second or third, is aimed at giving a more clear picture as to the nature of the problem.

I HATE FEELING DIZZY. WILL MY THERAPIST MAKE ME DIZZY?

Sometimes. The path to solving a problem means that we might provoke the symptoms to understand the cause. This unfortunately means that, at times, persons will experience their dizziness in PT. It is always my recommendation that a person plans to give themselves a few minutes of rest after their first PT visit, like for example sitting or lying with their eyes closed for 10 minutes prior to leaving the clinic. I also encourage that they don’t attempt to drive for the remainder of that first day. Have a friend or cab driver on standby! The good news is that, once the problem and triggers are understood, the therapist and patient can work together to build a treatment program that allows for progressive and tolerable movement forward into greater life participation and less discomfort. As with all PT, the patient should feel better over time, and therefore the dizziness provoked in the clinic should be gradually less and less.

HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE TO FEEL BETTER?

It depends! As I imagine you’d guess by now, different problems have different time frames of healing. Recovery from a stroke can take months, while some forms of BPPV can improve in one to two visits. It’s dependent on the individual. You’re thinking, “How vague?!” To this I’d respond, “I know!” The key is to get the process moving, and start the work of healing. To that end, I encourage anyone with questions or the desire to live without dizziness to contact your doctor and therapist.

 


Elizabeth D'Annunzio Shah Physical Therapist New York CityElizabeth D’Annunzio Shah, PT, DPT, OCS, MTC works with patients of all ages and abilities including recreational athletes, professional dancers and performing artists. She has a special interest in vestibular and balance disorders, movement theory and creative solutions for both neurologically and musculoskeletally impaired persons. Elizabeth is passionate about exercise as a means to maintain health, manage stress and enjoy life! She practices yoga in the Iyengar tradition, is an avid surfer, and participates in distance running events whenever possible. (read more)


     

School Backpack Safety

Posted on Posted in All Posts, Sidelined

As “Back to School” shopping begins, it’s important to do your homework to keep your child free from backpack related injuries.

Over 5 thousand emergency room visits a year by kids 18 and under are reportedly due to school backpack related injuries.  A major problem – kids carrying heavy loads in their school bags! Studies found more than half the students surveyed were carrying loads that exceeded the maximum safe weight for kids.  Finding the right sized school bag and teaching your child how to properly wear a backpack is just as important as lightening the load they carry to and from school each day.

TYPES OF INJURIES

A heavy backpack, or one worn incorrectly, can leave your child at risk for injuries like neck, back and shoulder pain. A school bag that is loaded up can significantly load the spine and surrounding joints. Wearing it improperly such as over one shoulder or sagging too low can place added stress on the vertebrae, discs, nerves, and muscles. It can also foster bad posture.

WHEN YOUR CHILD’S BACKPACK DOESN’T PASS THE TEST

If that school backpack is creating some issues, your child may start to complain of different symptoms. They include:

• Pain while wearing the backpack
• Headaches
• Shoulder pain
• Low back or neck pain
• Tingling in arms or legs
• Red marks on your child’s shoulder where the straps are worn
• Stooped posture

backpack safety thrive physical therapy soho nycTIPS FOR WEARING A SCHOOL BACKPACK

• LIGHTEN THE LOAD!  Your child’s backpack should not exceed more than 10 – 15% of your child’s weight (ex: If your child weighs 100 lbs. the backpack should be 10-15 lbs.)
• Wear both shoulder straps that should be padded for comfort
• Waist belts can help distribute and support the load
• The size of the backpack should match the size of the child
• Backpacks should sit near your shoulders NOT above them
• Backpacks should sit in the contour of your low back
(Think of your belly button line and it should not fall more than 2- 4 inches below that level)
• Choose a bag that has multiple compartments. Place heavier items closer to body and lighter ones away. Also keep sharp objects in compartments away from the body
• Avoid placing child’s name on the outside of the bag
• Place a reflector on bag to allow cars to see your child at night

ALTERNATIVES?

To help lighten the load on your kids, speak with teachers to see if there are electronic versions of textbooks available or if you can purchase two textbooks – one to keep at home and the other to keep in the classroom. Some teachers send home lighter pamphlets to complete throughout the week which help avoid students having to lug a heavy book back and forth.

If you think your child is experiencing some discomfort due to a backpack – speak with your physician or physical therapist who can evaluate and determine if that is causing your child’s symptoms.  A physical therapist can also design a strengthening and flexibility program for students to help them tone up for toting those backpacks this semester.

Image above shows Thrive PT Amy McGorry demonstrating the proper way to wear a backpack. Image courtesy of Home & Family on the Hallmark Channel.


AmyMcGorry Physical TherapistAmy McGorry, PT, DPT MTC, is a senior staff physical therapist at Thrive PT in NoHo New York. She received her Bachelor’s of Science in physical therapy from SUNY Stony Brook in 1991 and earned her doctoral degree in physical therapy from the University of St. Augustine in 2011. In 2005 Amy, completed an advanced certification in Orthopedic Manual Joint Manipulation from the University of St. Augustine. In addition to her clinical skills, Dr. McGorry is a freelance news reporter for Channel 12 and contributes medical articles, short videos and slideshows to health and wellness websites. (read more)

     

Who Are Physical Therapists, What Do We Do, and How Are We Unique in the Medical Landscape?

Posted on Posted in All Posts, Let's Get Technical

Hello out there, Thrive loyalists.  To those of you who spend much time inside our clinic, you might find this blog topic odd given your familiarity with physical therapy.  That said, I have many times been asked, by persons I’m in process of evaluating, what IS physical therapy?  I grew up with a physical therapist (PT) as a mom, so for me the idea that one doesn’t know what we do is foreign.  I suppose I’ve always had proximity to the profession.  It has come to my attention that, while I’ve been in and around PT gyms forever, that’s not true for many.  So, I’m writing this to give some clarity to those out there who wonder what exactly we are qualified to do and how we fit into the wellness and rehabilitation realm.

physical therapy cervicalWHO ARE PHYSICAL THERAPISTS?

PTs are, by and large, persons with a passion for PEOPLE, science, movement theory, rehabilitation, and often times exercise.  All PTs graduated in the past 10 years have clinical doctorates (DPTs), making them Doctors of Physical Therapy.  This means that, including clinical internships, PTs go to school for roughly 7 years.  Prior to making the DPT the entry-level degree, persons graduated with a Masters Degree or Bachelors Degree, depending on when they were educated.  All PTs are licensed by our governing body and have to maintain that license with continuing education requirements.  The reason I share this is to clarify that, while there is variety and art in the practice of PT, there is also a rigorous set of scientific standards required to get and maintain a license.  This is good for the patient!  In most states, persons can go directly to an outpatient PT without a physician’s referral.  All this credentialing and schooling is a safeguard for the patient so that you can trust your PT as the first line of defense when you have orthopedic pain, and also trust that they know enough to know when they need to refer you to a doctor.

WHAT DO WE DO?

Lots! In seriousness, you may interact with PTs in an outpatient clinic (like Thrive), a hospital, a cardiac rehab center, and a child’s school.  PTs can specialize in women’s and men’s pelvic floor dysfunction, hand rehabilitation, and lymphedema management, vestibular issues.  We’re everywhere.  At Thrive, you are interacting with orthopedic PTs, meaning we are specialists in the management of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular dysfunction.   What’s that, you ask?  It’s basically any injury or dysfunction that influences the muscles and bones and the creation of movement and/or the coordination of those muscles via the nervous system.  If you’re now thinking, “That seems to cover a lot,” you’d be correct!!  That broad umbrella includes orthopedic post surgical recovery, back and neck pain, muscle and ligament strains and sprains, jaw pain, balance and fall dysfunction, etc.  It’s our passion and goal to return our patients to function, get them back to work or sport or whatever moves them.  We want to see our patients doing what they love without fear of injury or pain.

kinesio taping in room at Thrive SoHoHOW ARE WE UNIQUE?

PTs, by and large, get in the field because we are interested in people.  We talk to our patients, put our hands on them as a means to stretch and manipulate tissue, and problem solve as a team to get them moving.  It is physical and highly interactive work!  It affords us the great privilege of truly knowing the patient and serving as a resource for them.   It is my humble opinion that PTs are expert in not only the management of pain and rehabilitation from injury but also in its prevention.  Rather than coming to Thrive when your back has been hurting for 6 months, imagine the scenario where you come prior to pain for the ergonomic evaluation, stretching program, and hands on re-education that allowed you to function at your best.   I know that, for many, that’s impossible due to time and financial constraints.  So, instead consider coming in when your pain starts…get an early lead on the healing process.  Ultimately, whether you’ve had chronic pain, recent surgery, or want to problem solve out how to return to running after baby, PTs are ready to help you move forward towards achieving your goals!


Elizabeth D'Annunzio Shah Physical Therapist New York CityElizabeth D’Annunzio Shah, PT, DPT, OCS, MTC works with patients of all ages and abilities including recreational athletes, professional dancers and performing artists. She has a special interest in vestibular and balance disorders, movement theory and creative solutions for both neurologically and musculoskeletally impaired persons. Elizabeth is passionate about exercise as a means to maintain health, manage stress and enjoy life! She practices yoga in the Iyengar tradition, is an avid surfer, and participates in distance running events whenever possible. (read more)


     

Beyond the Nightguard: How Physical Therapy Can Help TMJ Pain

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The alarm clock rings waking you from sleep, you remove your nightguard, yawn, and instead of greeting the new day with excitement, you cringe and grab your jaw. Frustrated with the ongoing pain and soreness in your jaw, you wonder, “Why isn’t my nightguard working?”

jaw pain TMJ TMD physical therapy can helpSuffering from Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) or Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction (TMJ) can be frustrating. But what most people don’t realize is that it takes more than a mouth guard to address the underlying source of the dysfunction. That’s where physical therapy can help.

The Temporomandibular joint – the joint where your jaw and ear meet – can often be the site of pain and discomfort. Think of walking with one shoe on and one shoe off, eventually your back or hip will start to feel stress and irritated from the poor alignment of your joints. The same thing can happen with your bite when your teeth and jaw are not properly aligned. Typically, a mouth guard or bite guard, recommended by a dentist or orthodontist, is used to adjust the bite and jaw to a position that helps relieve some of the pain and discomfort associated with TMJ dysfunction. While a bite guard may provide some symptom relief, a physical therapist can help address the muscle imbalance and joint restrictions that can also contributing to tension at your jaw. This combination can typically help those who suffer from TMJ/TMD issues as well as headaches.

STRUCTURAL ISSUES:

Imagine a stuck door hinge. The door can’t open fully if a hinge is “stuck” or not gliding correctly, nor can your jaw. It needs to glide properly to open and close. A manually trained physical therapist can evaluate your jaw and see how it is restricted. The joints in the upper cervical region (your neck) such as the atlas and axis vertebrae located just below your head, can get restricted from faulty postures or tight muscles. This can affect head, neck and jaw motions creating additional tension. Physical therapy for TMD/TMJ dysfunction includes manual joint mobility techniques to help the Temporomandibular move more easily. During your session your physical therapist will perform gentle muscle energy techniques or joint mobilizations to the neck to help restore proper motion to the vertebra. Soft tissue massage can also be performed, not only to the muscles along the neck and head, but also inside of the mouth. This helps to release tension in the muscles in your cheek near the TMJ.

THERE ARE STRINGS ATTACHED

upper cross lower crossThe saying goes “everything comes with strings attached” and it certainly applies to your jaw and neck. Certain muscles attach to the jaw to help you open and close it. The masseter, the pterygoids and temporalis muscles, among others, all must synchronize to help pull and navigate your jaw as it opens to talk, grind and chew throughout the day. Studies by Vladimir Janda, MD, show that muscle imbalances occur in the body can that affect the head and neck. Janda describes the upper cross syndrome where tightness of the upper trapezius and levator scapula (neck and shoulder muscles) occurs with tightness of the pectoral muscles (chest muscles). Weakness of the cervical flexors (anterior neck muscles) can be present along with weakness of the middle and lower trapezius located in your upper back near your shoulder blades.  This imbalance can create stress to your joints in the neck, and upper back and shoulders. This can all play a role with your posture and the way your jaw sits, opens, closes and the tension in the muscles that attach to your jaw.

 “TONGUE IN CHEEK”

Tongue position can play a role in your jaw pain. It is recommended that you rest your tongue up on the roof of your mouth as if saying “NO” or making a “clucking “sounds.  When your tongue is resting at the bottom jaw level you typically rest with the mouth open and this can “weigh your jaw down” and create tension of the muscles that attach to your jaw. Your physical therapist can teach you tricks to good posture and special exercises to perform gently with your mouth to help stretch tighten muscles and strengthen and stabilize that region fostering proper motion.

INFORMATION TO “CHEW ON”

Practicing stress relief techniques, avoiding difficult to chew foods in your diet and scheduling an evaluation by a physical therapist and dentist can help you address this painful situation. A physical therapist can play an integral part of your TMD/TMJ dysfunction rehabilitation by evaluating your posture and joint mobility. They will also work with you to develop a stretching and strengthening program to help establish a more neutral posture and alleviate stress at the jaw and neck joints.

 

References and links:
https://www.drweil.com/health-wellness/body-mind-spirit/stress-anxiety/breathing-three-exercises/
http://www.jandaapproach.com/the-janda-approach/jandas-syndromes/

Image of man with jaw pain by artur84 freedigitalphotos.net


AmyMcGorry Physical TherapistAmy McGorry, PT, DPT MTC, Received her Bachelor’s of Science in physical therapy from SUNY Stony Brook in 1991 and earned her doctoral degree in physical therapy from the University of St. Augustine in 2011. In 2005 Amy, completed an advanced certification in Orthopedic Manual Joint Manipulation from the University of St. Augustine. In addition to her clinical skills, Dr. McGorry is a freelance news reporter for Channel 12 and contributes medical articles, short videos and slideshows to health and wellness websites. (read more)

     

Instagram Insider: Physical Therapy Session at Thrive PT

Posted on Posted in All Posts, Stay in the Game

This week, on our Instagram, we followed along as Thrive PT Elizabeth D’Annunzio Shah, PT, DPT, OCS, MTC evaluated and treated our aide Katie in our SoHo clinic. Katie is a dancer and presents with hip pain when in the squat or single leg stance positions. We have assembled the Instagram story here for you so you can follow the journey from beginning to end and get a little behind the scenes look at what a physical therapy session is all about.

Evaluations at Thrive are different for each patient, but always begin with an analysis of movement as related to the individual’s specific complaints. Below, her PT Elizabeth is observing her move, palpating the joint, and deciding what to look at next!

While dancing, Katie spends a lot of time in single leg stance.  In an effort to understand her right hip pain, Elizabeth looks at her in single leg stance, both with the right foot moving and right foot down.  She progresses from this parallel stance posture to single leg stance in first position.  It’s always necessary to look at the positions important to the individual!  The teacher has different physical behaviors than the dancer, the architect different postures than the electrician.  As such, all patients at Thrive receive individual attention and are asked to move in ways specific to their lifestyle.

It is discovered that Katie’s left hip is sitting anterior in the joint socket, and Elizabeth chooses to help glide the hip more posteriorly in the supine position.  There are many ways to accomplish this task, both by hands on manual therapy and active exercise.  Luckily, the 45 minute, one-on-one treatment blocks at Thrive allow for creativity and active problem solving between the patient and the therapist.

To the gym!  Katie is on the reformer, doing one exercise of many with an emphasis on folding at the hip joint.  From this parallel position, she moves to first position and then to second position, replicating in supine the postures she dances in daily.  (Of course, our Boomerang version is not as smooth of a movement as in real life, but you get the idea.)

Task specific practice is key!  At the session’s end, Katie practices folding over her left hip with a dance posture she regularly assumes.  She has no pain, and her session’s been gearing towards dance specific movement the whole time.  It is always the goal at Thrive to get our clients back to moving!  We want you to do what you love without pain.  While you might not be a dancer, your movement goal is no less important, and your journey will be no less specific.

We hope you enjoyed tagging along with Elizabeth and Katie on Instagram this week. If you’ve never been to physical therapy, hopefully this story has provided you with an idea of what to expect if you ever need to visit a physical therapist yourself.

Thanks for reading!


Elizabeth D'Annunzio Shah Physical Therapist New York CityElizabeth D’Annunzio Shah, PT, DPT, OCS, MTC works with patients of all ages and abilities including recreational athletes, professional dancers and performing artists. She has a special interest in vestibular and balance disorders, movement theory and creative solutions for both neurologically and musculoskeletally impaired persons. Elizabeth is passionate about exercise as a means to maintain health, manage stress and enjoy life! She practices yoga in the Iyengar tradition, is an avid surfer, and participates in distance running events whenever possible. (read more)


           

Staff Updates

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Join us in congratulating Thrive PT Elizabeth D’Annunzio Shah PT, DPT, OCS, MTC for passing her exams and becoming an Manual Certified Therapist. She has officially added a few more very meaningful letters to the end of her name.

Elizabeth D'Annunzio Shah Physical Therapist New York CityHere is a little more info about what that means:
The University of St. Augustine is a leader in the physical therapy field in manual techniques for the treatment of orthopedic patients. The university offers the opportunity for professional PTs to pursue a manual certification, during which time they take courses, hone very specific hands on skills, and refine those tools during a 6 day oral, practical, and written testing process. Elizabeth passed this test and is thrilled to be dubbed a Manually Certified Therapist (MTC). She hopes to use these skills to more efficiently and directly assess and treat her patients, and is looking forward to continuing to care for the Thrive community.

YAY LIZ!! We are thrilled to have such a smart and talented team supporting us here in NYC at Thrive.